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Canadian Horse Journal – Summer 2021

Canadian Horse Journal is available in print on new stands and by subscription, Digital editions are also available.

SPECIAL FEATURES
  • Seven Deadly Sins of Haymaking
  • Help Your Barn Business Thrive
  • When Things Go Wrong in the Show Ring
  • Meet the Canadians Who Mastered the Maclay
  • Building Better Barn Cultures
  • Switching Coasts: Home is Where Your Horse Is
  • Traditions: Do They Help or Hinder?
HORSE HEALTH
  • Horses and Wildfire Smoke
  • Hot Weather Horse Care
  • Improvements in Equine Ranching
  • Hoof Care Tips & Myth Busters
  • Foot Injuries of the Equine Athlete
  • Moving Well by Breathing Well
DEPARTMENTS
  • Horse Council BC News
  • Manitoba Horse Council News
  • Canadian Therapeutic Riding Association News
  • The Hoofbeat

Canadian Horse Journal is the Exclusive Print Media Partner of the Canadian Quarter Horse Association.

Look for CQHA NEWS  featured in every issue! CQHA members enjoy a special subscription offer. 

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Nation Valley Ranch Vaulting Club & their Quarter Horse Unicorns

Author: Samantha Mirzaee, CQHA Media Team Member & Equestrain Photographer

© 2020 Samantha Mirzaee Photography - All Rights Reserved.
© 2020 Samantha Mirzaee Photography - All Rights Reserved.

In the early morning hours this past fall on a small beach in Iroquois, Ontario, I caught up with the National Valley Ranch Vaulting Club to photograph them showcasing their incredible talent.

When I arrived on location, fog clung low over the water and the light from the rising sun was just starting to be visible. A solitary early morning dog walker curiously looked on as the rumbling sound of a truck and trailer announced the arrival of two very special horses followed closely by a group of talented young ladies.

So how does an equestrian decide to go from ‘traditional riding’ to vaulting which is often described as ‘gymnastics on horseback’?  To find out, I caught up with CQHA member, Jennifer Byvelds owner of the Capital Cowgirls Drill Team and owner of the National Valley Ranch in Chesterville, Ontario.

Getting Into Vaulting

Byvelds is an accomplished horsewoman, owner of the Capital Cowgirls Drill Team and owner of the National Valley Ranch in Chesterville, Ontario. Two years ago, she watched a clinic with a former Cavaila performer and invited them to come to her ranch to work on cossack trick riding. While buying cossack riding tack, she saw a vaulting surcingle for sale and bought it, “just to play with.”

A few months later she sold all her cossack tack and invested in more vaulting equipment! She  worked with the Cavalia performer and connected with an Ontario vaulting club outside of the Greater Toronto Area called Hoofprint vaulting. They helped Byvelds start a club in Ottawa and had her mentoring with them for the completion of her Vault Canada coaching certification.

The club officially launched in March 2020 and, like most activities around that time, were quickly shut down two weeks later due to Covid. When outdoor recreational activities reopened later that year however, the club re-started as strong as ever.

The Club 

For their inaugural year, the club had superb participation with about 25 vaulters and 10 that were interested in showing with ages ranging from 8 to 32. The competitive team practices roughly six times per month.

Vaulting is a great sport for building confidence, trust with your team members and your horse, and building your mental resilience because vaulting is a hugely mental game according to Byvelds. “The progress I saw this year with the vaulters blew my mind,” Byvelds says and she credits this to the atmosphere that the team created and the support that they gave each other.


Training always starts on the ground and moves are learned on barrel horses or an air horse (a life-like horse sized piece of training equipment). Once the vaulter masters the moves on the ground and they are balanced and smooth, they graduate to a real horse. Real horses are only used for roughly the last half of each practice which prevents them from being overworked.

Meeting Unicorns

Two of the horses Byvelds she uses for the Vaulting Club are Beau (Play Bay), a handsome bay quarter horse gelding and Willow (Strawberry Shortcake), a sweet grey quarter horse mare. These horses were complete professionals and from the minute they unloaded in the parking lot of the beach to the time they packed up to leave – you’d have thought they’d done it a million times before.

The horses that Byvelds lovingly refers to as ‘unicorns’ came into her life at a very special time. Six years ago she had a horrific riding accident. “My accident was a total fluke, I had a horse go down under me while galloping in a field and broke my back and neck. Even though it was an accident, I needed something super solid to get back on.”

After the accident she sold her green horses and, in her own words, “used the money to buy a unicorn….to rebuild my confidence… and that unicorn was Beau.”

Willow followed having initially been purchased for her daughter from a local ranch where she was known as the ‘ultimate safe school horse who adored children.’

According to Byvelds, one of the many great things about using quarter horses for vaulting is that they are small and sturdy which helps to build up students’ confidence before moving them to a larger horse. For this reason, all her students start on Beau and Willow. The club also uses a third horse owned by Circle J Ranch who, not surprisingly, is also a quarter horse and used for beginners.

When asked about her affinity for quarter horses, Byveld’s response was that they, “have the best temperaments! So easygoing and forgiving. LOVE THEIR minds.” Judging from the way Beau and Willow handled themselves that morning, I couldn’t agree more!

What’s Next for the vaulting team?

With the uncertainty that 2020 has brought all areas of the equestrian world, Byvelds and her team show no signs of slowing down. They’ve been diligently practicing and when gathering limitations have prevented in-person practice, they went virtual and practiced online.

With the commitment, dedication and camaraderie shared by all those on the team, I have no doubt 2021 will bring exciting things for this incredible group of people and horses.

© 2020 Samantha Mirzaee Photography - All Rights Reserved.
© 2020 Samantha Mirzaee Photography - All Rights Reserved.
© 2020 Samantha Mirzaee Photography - All Rights Reserved.
© 2020 Samantha Mirzaee Photography - All Rights Reserved.
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Bobby Kerr Inducted into the Texas Cowboy Hall of Fame

The Ridgewood Ontario born cowboy, and founder of the Texas Cowboy Hall of Fame, has been inducted into the prestigious hall of honour  himself.

Known for his talent as a horse trainer, Kerr has won numerous awards in roping, reining, working cow horse and cutting in his career spanning over 40 years.  

Famed on YouTube for his ““Good and broke limo” trick horse performances which have amassed over 10 million views, Kerr has performed at some of the biggest equine events in the world.

On behalf of the Canadian Quarter Horse community, the association, and all our members who know Mr. Kerr personally and by reputation, CQHA would like to congratulate him on this honour, and thank him for his lifetime of promoting the culture and integrity of the western lifestyle.

Visit the Texas Cowboy Hall of Fame’s  website to ream more about this Canadian cowboy and the others inducted along with him.

 

 

 

 

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Employment Opportunities in Canada’s Horse Industry

Announcing EquineJobTrack.ca – your source for horse industry jobs across Canada!

Equine Guelph has announced the reboot of JobTrack, its free online equine employment matching service.

Serving the Canadian horse community for nearly 20 years, JobTrack has been a popular job-matching service for thousands of employers and job seekers. After undergoing many updates and upgrades for user functionality, the free service is live and now available at this link. With its new facelift and upgraded user-ability, Equine JobTrack is poised to roll out across Canada to serve the equine industry nationally.

New expanded search and sort functions include the ability to sort searches by: racing or non-racing, sector, job position and region. Advanced searches using a locator map will assist both job seekers and employers in finding each other.

“Equine JobTrack is a vitally important part of supporting the horse industry, both racing and non-racing – and plays an essential role in job development in rural Canada,” says Sue Leslie, president of the Horsemen’s Benevolent Protective Association. “Currently, the racing industry is experiencing major labour shortages in Ontario. The upgraded Equine JobTrack webpage will support both employers and those looking for employment.”

Career pathways can be investigated with many feature videos and infographics showcasing careers in the equine industry. Training opportunities can also be explored by reviewing testimonials from Equine Guelph students who have found their niche in the industry with the help of highly valued, evidence-based education. People often get into the horse business because they love horses and want to spend their lives in the business but without ever receiving proper training in business and horse health. The Resources section can help applicants find the tools they need to pave their pathway to a rewarding career in the equine industry.

The goal of Equine JobTrack has always been to link jobs with training to support growth of the equine industry and rural development in Canada. The introduction of self-service profiles and upgraded user-ability has allowed the program to expand exponentially. The redevelopment of Equine JobTrack will more effectively connect employers with job-seekers nationwide.

“As director of Equine Guelph, I am so pleased that we can now offer this updated and functional pathway to employment for the equine industry in Canada as a free service,” says Gayle Ecker, director of Equine Guelph. “I would like to thank HBPA and Ontario Racing for their strong support of this initiative. Thanks also goes out to Grand River Agricultural Society for additional funding received.”

This program is funded in part through the Canadian Agricultural Partnership Program (the Partnership), a provincial-territorial initiative. The Ontario Ministry of Agricultural, Food and Rural Affairs assists in the delivery of CAP the Partnership in Ontario.

Originally developed with funding from the Horsemen’s Benevolent Protective Association of Ontario (HBPA), Equine Guelph is pleased to have financial support from HBPA once again. Additional collaborating partners include Grand River Agricultural Society, Ontario Racing, Ontario Equestrian and Standardbred Canada. Other industry partners include: AgCareers, Central Ontario Standardbred Association, Ontario Harness Horse Association and Quarter Racing Owners of Ontario Inc.

(Equine Guelph)

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Ontario Equine Hardship Program – Covid-19 Response

Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs – Equine Hardship Program
Overview

The Government of Ontario is providing conditional financial support to equine experience-based businesses, like riding lessons, summer riding camps, carriage rides, equine-based therapy and trail rides, that are facing financial hardship due to COVID-19 related business losses. The Equine Hardship Program will provide funding to eligible businesses that have experienced a significant decrease in business revenue and have continued to incur certain animal maintenance costs that they regularly rely on to operate.

Eligible Businesses
  • To be eligible under this program, businesses must confirm the following on the enrolment form:
    • The business earned at least 50 per cent of its gross business revenue by providing equine-based experiences* (e.g., riding lessons, summer riding camps, carriage rides, equine-based therapy and trail rides) in 2019.
    • The gross business revenue earned from the equine-based experiences in 2020 was less than half of what the business earned in 2019.
    • The business’ Canada Revenue Agency Business Number, if applicable.
    • The business is registered in Transfer Payment Ontario (TPON) – see enrolment form; and that the registration is up to date.
    • The business is registered to receive direct deposit payments through Supply Chain Ontario – see enrolment form; and that the registration is up to date.
  • The business must agree to provide further documentation to support expenses, income and financial statements upon OMAFRA’s request.
  • The business must be in compliance with all Requirements of Law and agree to remain in compliance with all Requirements of Law if receiving financial support under this program.
    *(Includes horses, ponies, mules, donkeys)

    Note: The Ministry reserves the right to inspect/verify information in the enrolment and claim forms including but not limited to site visits and requests for financial and tax documentation.
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Getting Through This – Together!

As we enter 2021, the industry is facing new challenges as Government and Health officials publish (ever) changing guidance surrounding COVID-19. Because we are hearing questions again from our clients, we felt it was appropriate to send out an updated set of Q&As.

By now, you will know that neither CapriCMW Insurance Services Ltd. nor your Provincial/Territorial equine association have the authority to open, close or modify the operations of your business. The best we can do is offer insurance / risk management related information and refer you to local government authority to get the most current details of what is “allowed” and what is “not allowed” in your area.

What we can also say is that insurers around the world have adjusted their policies to exclude claims related to the spread of the COVID virus. As you move forward in your 2021 business planning, you should assume that you will not be insured if someone alleges they contracted the virus at your place of business or from you directly. From a risk management standpoint, this means establishing specific COVID protocols, determining whether or not engaging with clients at this time is a good idea and using robust risk forms that address the full scope of risk of receiving service from you (including the spread of communicable disease).

Please read through the following Q & A. If you have any questions not addressed here, please let us know and we will be happy to respond.

For Commercial Equine Enterprise Operations, Clubs, Coaches, Trainers

1. If I establish acceptable protocols with the guidance of my local health authority, is my insurance coverage with CapriCMW in force?
Your insurance policy as administered by CapriCMW has not changed and has been in full force and effect throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. What continues to change is government oversight restricting the movement of people and the operation of many business enterprises. In some areas of the country, government officials are allowing activity but have made it very clear that return to activity comes with specific guidance and protocols to ensure everyone stays safe and healthy.

2. As an equine industry professional, I am aware of the evolving risks associated with COVID-19. Should I get my clients to sign new acknowledgement of risk forms that address this?
The short answer is “yes”. The best forms are those that address the general risks associated with equine activity and note that there is a possibility of disease being present at the farm, horse show, lesson etc. Just remember that the use of such forms is not a guarantee that a claim will not be brought against you. These forms are only one of many components in an effective risk management strategy. The following are examples of forms that we are seeing in the industry:

a. Acknowledgement of Risk form
A form that should be familiar to most readers that speaks to general bodily injury/property damage risks associated with equine related activity. This form is updated to include reference to “disease” and “communicable disease”. There is a form for persons over the age of majority and a separate form for those under the age of majority.

b. Daily Attestation Form
The general guidance on the use of this form is that it be signed EACH TIME a client is receiving service from you or attends at your place of business. Having a daily form helps to show the courts that you are undertaking a regular pattern of risk management for the benefit of your client if a claim were to emerge later.

c. Facility Form
This form is useful for boarding places and facilities where clients may attend on a regular basis. This is not a daily form.

d. Specific Event Form
As the name implies, this form would take the place of the Facility Form if you were to run a “one of” event (show, clinic etc.)

3. Can these forms be signed electronically?
From an insurance perspective, “e-signatures” are increasingly acceptable but suggest that you refer to your legal counsel in this regard to discuss the implication if you were sued.

4. How long do I need to keep these forms?
The forms need to be stored for several years. We suggest again that you refer to your legal counsel for their advice.

5. Are insurers going to cover claims arising from COVID-19 allegations brought against my business or me?
Insurers are now issuing specific exclusions surrounding bodily injury claims arising from COVID 19. This is an understandable position given the magnitude of this global pandemic. In the mid-term (a few years from now perhaps when a vaccine is truly in wide use), insurers may come back to the table as they have in the past when other world-wide calamities strike. As you engage in activity with your customers, you should assume there would be no coverage for COVID claims so that your risk management and mitigation plans are robust.

6. I understand I am not covered for COVID claims, but is the rest of my policy still valid?
The policy is in full force and effect for all insured risks as detailed on documentation issued… as long as you are not breaking the law.

Your Provincial and National Equine Sport Organizations continue to offer assistance to the community by offering general best practice guidance that considers the overall health and welfare of everyone involved – including the horse. Please visit your Provincial Equine Association website for COVID resources.

If you are in doubt of whether you are operating your business in compliance with government regulations, you should consult local authorities. Many regions have set up toll free hot lines for businesses to answer questions specific to COVID. If you can find such a resource in your region – use it.

If you have any further questions, we are here to help. Contact us by email for any COVID related questions at equine@capricmw.ca.

Sincerely,
Michael King, Partner
CapriCMW Insurance

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October Q Horse Hero Honourees

Congratulations to Our October Q Horse Heroes, Emily Bertrand, Todd Bailey, Cheryl Norris, and Laura Siebenthal-Baxter
Emily Bertrand

Emily Bertrand’s first horseback riding experience was on her aunt’s Quarter Horse, from that moment on Emily knew she wanted horses in her life.

In 2007, Emily purchased a rundown dilapidated farm in Barrhaven, Ontario, and turned it into a thriving equestrian centre that has become a true social enterprise and staple in our local community, known as Royale Equestrian Centre.  Now 23 years later, Emily has 250 students in peak times with 40 plus horses and 14 instructors, all this started with one horse, a Thoroughbred Mare, named Royale.

When the pandemic hit, Royale Equestrian Centre was closed, however there was still 40 plus horses to attend to. Staff had 2 teams that alternated with no intermingling while keeping the horses cleaned and fed. Emily stated, “This was a successful program, all provincial protocols were followed, and we made it through.”

Emily has taken on a new extension of her business with her cousin Cody Czeitler and the Calder Family. A second business, “Royale Ranch” will operate out of Ottawa’s oldest riding academy (1958), Green Belt Riding School. Green Belt closed in 2019 since then Emily and partners have been doing extensive renovations.  Emily is planning on a grand opening for June 1st weekend 2021. This facility will offer western riding activities with 20-40 horses. Truly Emily will be busy with Royale Equestrian Centre and Royale Ranch operating in full force.

Dedication is a strong suit during good and bad times. Emily has been awarded the “Faces Award” for Ottawa area and Equestrian Center of the year, in Ottawa 2019. In addition to these prestigious awards, Emily enjoys community involvement including: Ottawa Food Bank, Shepherds of Good Hope, and, Boys and Girls Club.

CQHA honors Emily Bertrand as a 2020 Canadian Quarter Horses Association Q Horse Hero.

Mathieu Cormier

Twenty years ago, was a new beginning for Mathieu Cormier, this is when he began riding in a local Pony Club. His introduction was on “Bailey”, a Haflinger.  Mathieu rode jumpers before turning to the Quarter Horse Circuit

Mathieu is employed as a Nurse’s Aid at the Centre Hospital University of Sherbrooke, (CHUS), located in Sherbrooke, QC.  His career at CHUS has covered many departments, however, currently working the Emergency Department. CHUS is the fourth largest hospital in Quebec, and the local hospital for Sherbrooke residents.  It also provides care to the entire population of the Eastern Townships. The CHUS offers services to about one million people.

The pandemic has had a toll on many, including Mathieu who was working over 100 hours a week caring for patients.  Mathieu carried the burden for two, as his husband’s place of employment was closed, bills had to be paid.

Pandemic rules, closed the facility where Mathieu kept his show horse, however, when he had a few free hours he was able to help some less fortunate horse owners who needed a helping hand to care for their horses.

Mathieu’s integrity is just another example of Equestrians shining through all crises.

CQHA honors Mathieu Cormier as a 2020 Canadian Quarter Horses Association Q Horse Hero.        

Pam Esteves

Pam’s   devotion to riding horses began as a young when she was enrolled in lessons. Pam’s family supported her passion at local horse shows. As the family became more involved a Quarter Horse mare was purchased for Pam to continue her dream of training and showing.

Pam worked at different equestrian farms gaining the knowledge that has made molded her success at Azores Stable as head Coach. Pam and her husband Marco, whom is also very accomplished on the equestrian scene, with accomplishments as a high end groom for prominent stables. Together they make a winning team crossing imported Warm Bloods on their Andalusian stallion, resulting in Spanish Warm bloods.

During the height of the pandemic, Pam managed to home school her children between keeping the training up on clients show horses. Pam stated, “This was a trying time, no one was allowed on the farm, Marco and I were going from sun up to sun down.”

Pam received the “Person that makes a difference award” from OEF a few years. Pam has also been on the Gaited Horse Association Board of Directors for 15 years, serving 4 years as Vice President and 2 years as President.

CQHA honors Pam Esteves as a 2020 Canadian Quarter Horses Association Q Horse Hero.           

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Teagan Goodsell

Teagan Goodsell, was raised on her parents farm in Alberta, known as Rolling O Ranches. At the Rolling O Ranch many great racing Quarter Horses have impacted the Alberta Quarter Horse Racing.

After graduating from high school, Teagan studied Electrical Engineering at the University of Alberta. The lure of the horses brought Teagan back to the race horse industry. Teagan and her husband Allen operate a racing Quarter Horse and Thoroughbred stable in Alberta. Allen is a trainer and Teagan is a retired jockey, in the height of her jockey career (2012) Teagan’s race mounts earned $148, 820.00.

Teagan fondly remembers one of their racehorses: Mr Eleanor, who won the couple their first owner Stakes Race, and now proving himself in the barrel arena.

Now retired, Teagan is the Program Coordinator for the Alberta Quarter Horse Racing Association. Teagan’s responsibilities include preparing BOD Documentation, helping board committee’s in various annual events such as their Yearling Sale and Awards Banquet.

Teagan has received many awards as a Jockey including: ACTRA Top Rookie Rider (2008), and the Leading Riding Award (2012) at Evergreen Park.

Teagan is a new Director with Canadian Quarter Horse Association. She is looking forward to the position.

CQHA honors Teagan Goodsell as a 2020 Canadian Quarter Horses Association Q Horse Hero.         

Bob Zylstra

Bob’s introduction to horses was first through his family and miniature horses. Today, Bob has a strong devotion to The G.R.E.A.T. Saddle Club in Tillsonburg, Ontario. In 2007, Bob was one of the founding members, now he is the President of the Saddle Club. Bob dedicates many hours to providing the youth members of G.R.E.A.T with every opportunity to learn and have fun with their horses.

This past year, (2020), The G.R.E.A.T. BOD decided not to have any horse shows or other activities due to the pandemic. Bob decided this was a good year to rebuild the show pen for the kids, hoping 2021 would be a better year for horse club activities. 

Bob is a long distance truck driver for Smale Farms Ltd., located in Mossley, Ontario. Smale Farms operate as a licensed grain handling and storage facility for corn, wheat, soybeans and rye. Smale Farms provide the local farming communities by connecting the markets in both Canada and the United States.

When not long haul trucking grain to farmers on both sides of the border, Bob is taking care of the family farm and their Quarter horses. This act of kindness relieves the workload of other family members.

CQHA honors Bob Zylstra as a 2020 Canadian Quarter Horses Association Q Horse Hero.        

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September Q Horse Hero Honourees

Congratulations to Our September Q Horse Heroes, Christine St-Jean, Todd Bailey, Cheryl Norris, and Laura Siebenthal-Baxter
Christine St-Jean

Christine’s devotion to riding quarter horses began as a 15 year old girl when her mother
purchased a quarter horse for her. Christine showed local shows for a few years, until she got
the bug to attend the Ontario Quarter Horse Circuit.

Christine’s remote northern Ontario location does not stop her from trailering her show horse
12 hours one way to exhibit in western pleasure, showmanship and trail. Christine is proud of
her horses, and the foals that she has raised, breeding to top Quarter Horse Stallions in North
America. Christine is a Director with Ontario Quarter Horse Amateur Association (OAQHA)
maintaining the Facebook page, and engaging in various fund raising efforts.

Christine travels 50 minutes one way to Timmins and District Hospital, where for the past 30
years she is employed as a Laboratory Technician. Her job is covers emergency department,
microbiology department, and the main laboratory. Timmins and District Hospital is a full
service hospital for Northern Ontario residences, partnering with Lakehead University,
Laurentian Medicine.Over and above Christine’s position as a Laboratory Technician and position with OAQHA,

Christine was the founder of “Horses for Hoof”. This initiative raised 10,000.00 dollars through
clinics, and various other horse activities for the emergency department at Timmins and District
Hospital and Northern College.

CQHA honours Christine St-Jean as a 2020 Canadian Quarter Horses Association Q Horse Hero.

Cheryl Norris

Cheryl Norris is one of those dedicated equestrian volunteers. She is no stranger to the Quarter
Horse show circuit operation and exhibition. Her specialty on the Quarter Horse Circuit was
Hunter Under Saddle and Pleasure Driving.Cheryl has assumed the position of President of Eastern Ontario Quarter Horse Association (EOQHA) currently for eleven years.

Decisions to cancel all events for 2020 due to Covid-19 did not stop Cheryl from engaging EOQHA members in a virtual clinic with renowned trainer and futurity prospect, Brian Isabell. Cheryl is well respected as the anchor of EOQHA, at the Summer Sizzler 2019 the board of director’s presented Cheryl with an recognition award. In Cheryl’s words: “It was very kind to be recognized” The recognition award read, “we should acknowledge that Cheryl has been president for 10 yrs now and without her dedication EOQHA would not be where it is today. “

Cheryl’s love for the horses spills over into the miniature show circuit, where she exhibits in halter, roadster, single pleasure driving , tandem hitch as well as multi hitch classes , cones, and . . Another
fun class is barrels (yes while driving your fastest mini)

Cheryl’s story does not end here. For the past 25 years Cheryl has been employed at Kemptville District Hospital in the Dietary Department. Kemptville District Hospital is a fully accredited healthcare facility
committed to building healthier communities.

During her career, Cheryl was on the award winning team to receive: Regional Unit of the Year by Morrison, the healthcare division of Compass Group Canada, the hospital’s food service provider. The KDH unit was chosen from healthcare organizations all over the region, which encompasses Quebec, Ontario and Manitoba.(excerpt from Kemptville District Hospital)


CQHA honours Cheryl Norris as a 2020 Canadian Quarter Horses Association Q Horse Hero.

Todd Bailey

Todd Bailey certainly is no stranger to the equestrian world. Todd juggles his time between
family, saddle maker, trainer and horse show judge.

Todd and his wife Peggy have carried on the long family tradition of saddle making for 38 years,
learning the trade from his father Don Bailey, founder of Bailey Saddles. Todd’s talents go
beyond saddle making. For the past 34 years, Todd is one of the most sought after judges,
holding multiple judging cards; and during this pandemic, Todd has judged virtual shows and real
time shows across Canada.

Todd has been an active director and president on various boards including Alberta Paint Horse
Association, Area 2 Quarter Horse Association, Ontario Paint Association, All Equine Show in
London, Ontario and London Fair Board.

Todd extends his kindly manner to everyone he meets, and he’s been gracious to assist virtual show managers and competitors alike this year, by donating his judging fees and giving exhibitors constructive feedback on their video entries.

CQHA honors Todd Bailey as a 2020 Canadian Quarter Horses Association Q Horse Hero.

Laura Siebenthal-Baxter

Laura is currently in her twelfth year as letter carrier, employed by Canada Post in the Province
of Ontario.

After completing her Bachelor of Science in Psychology and Social Work, Laura took a position
with a Police Service and also worked as a Emergency Medical Technician on a rural ambulance.

Juggling a career and family, Laura enjoys equestrian activities with her daughter and
grandchildren. Volunteering with Canadian Pony Club, Equine Assisted Learning and rescuing
horses which keeps the family busy.

Laura enjoys riding her Quarter Horse / Appaloosa cross mare “Dixie”, volunteering with
Ontario Mounted Special Service Unit which is a proud alliance partner of the Canadian Quarter
Horse Association.

For being an essential part of her community, CQHA honours Laura Siebenthal-Baxter as a 2020 Canadian Quarter Horses Association Q Horse Hero.

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Lord Strathcona’s Horse – Mounted Troop

Trooper, Strathcona’s Horse in South Africa. This image strikingly shows why Strathcona’s Horse, perhaps more than any other unit in South Africa, became identified with the popular image of the Canadian cowboy.
HISTORY & ORIGINS : Canada & The South African War, 1899-1902

On 10 January 1900, Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal, the Canadian High Commissioner to the United Kingdom, offered to raise a regiment at his own expense for service in the British Army in South Africa. The Imperial authorities accepted his offer and thus was born one of the more unusual regiments of the South African War. While officially a British unit, the distinction was lost on the Canadian public, politicians, and the men serving in its ranks. It could hardly have been otherwise, as the unit was recruited entirely in the Canadian West. It was equipped by the Canadian government, quartered in Lansdowne Park, Ottawa, and paraded on Parliament Hill. The men cut impressive figures, resplendent in wide-brimmed Stetsons, and mounted on cow ponies with western saddles and lassos.

The unit was known as Strathcona’s Horse. It was made up of three quadrons recruited in Manitoba, the territories that would later become the provinces of Saskatchewan and Alberta, and British Columbia.

A cadre of mounted police joined Strathcona’s Horse, among them the commanding officer, the legendary Superintendent Sam Steele.

Strathcona’s Horse arrived in Cape Town on 10 April 1900, and was delayed there by an outbreak of disease among its horses. Finally, in June, the regiment joined General Buller’s Natal Field Force and took part in the clearing of the Boer forces from that colony, and also in operations intended to link up with the main army in the Transvaal. On 5 July, at Wolve Spruit, a member of the unit, Sergeant Arthur Richardson, was awarded the Victoria Cross for rescuing a wounded and unhorsed comrade.

The regiment experienced a considerable amount of hard fighting during the remainder of its tour of operations. In January 1901, the Canada-bound unit stopped in London where the new monarch, King Edward VII, personally presented its members with their South African campaign medals, while Lord Strathcona proudly looked on.

Map Indicating the Movement of the Strathcona’s Horse, 20 June – 1 September 1900

The Troop Today

The Strathcona Mounted Troop is an authorized volunteer display unit. The Troop is reminiscent of Lord Strathcona’s Horse in the nineteen twenties and thirties. The twenty-horse, twenty-five member Troop performs the Musical Ride. The ride is drawn from the Regiment’s traditions of the nineteen twenties and thirties.
When was the Troop Formed?

The current Strathcona Mounted Troop was formed in 1977. The original Ceremonial Mounted Troop was formed in 1923 as a means of honouring and maintaining the Cavalry traditions of the Lord Strathcona’s Horse (Royal Canadians). The original Troop was disband in 1939 when the Regiment moved to armoured vehicles as Canada joined the world in preparations for the Second World War.

Who are the people in the Troop?

The twenty-five members of the Strathcona Mounted Troop are soldiers of Lord Strathcona’s Horse (Royal Canadians). The members of the Troop volunteer for one or two years to serve in much the same manner as Strathcona’s did in the nineteen twenties. Their daily schedule concentrates on the care of their mounts and equipment, and in cavalry drills and training. In addition, they are responsible to remain ready for active military duty, and must therefore participate in trade specific training. The Troop Leader is Captain Corey McLean and the Troop’s Ride Master is Warrant Officer James Clarke.

What is Lord Strathcona’s Horse (Royal Canadians)?

Lord Strathcona’s Horse (Royal Canadians) is a regular force armoured unit of the Canadian Forces. The Strathcona’s primary fighting vehicle is the Leopard tank. Its reconnaissance squadron utilizes the Coyote, of the Light Armoured Vehicle (LAV) family. The Strathcona’s are the only regular force armoured unit in Western Canada.

Who owns the horses?

The mounts of the Strathcona Mounted Troop are provided through the Ceremonial Mounted Troop Foundation, and remain Foundation property. The mounts are neither purchased by nor maintained by the Canadian Forces or the Department of National Defense.

Does the Army issue the uniforms and equipment?

The uniforms, accoutrements (badges and buttons) saddles and tack are not the property of the Canadian Forces or the Department of National Defense. These items are provided through the Ceremonial Mounted Troop Foundation, and remain Foundation property.

How does the Strathcona Mounted Troop Travel?

Public support is provided in transporting the Strathcona Mounted Troop with regards to personnel and support vehicles. Transportation of our 20 horse trailer is provided by one of our proud sponsors, Bison Transport. The twenty-horse trailer purchased in 1998, however, was provided by the Ceremonial Mounted Troop Foundation with the assistance of the Wild Rose Foundation.

What is the Ceremonial Mounted Troop Foundation?

The Ceremonial Mounted Troop Foundation is a non-profit company registered in the Province of Alberta. This registered charitable organization has the sole object of providing for and maintaining the Strathcona Mounted Troop for the enjoyment of the general public, and to provide public education on Canadian Cavalry heritage, history and tradition. From its inception in 1984, the Foundation has grown from the generosity of Alberta corporations and friends of the Strathcona’s. The primary source of funds remains private donation, and honourariums.

Can the Strathcona Mounted Troop be booked by any organization?

Any organization or individual can book the Strathcona Mounted Troop throughout the active display season May through October. Availability is dependent on the distance from Edmonton, Alberta, and on conflict with annual commitments. The Troop, for instance, is booked for all major events at Spruce Meadows. An information and requirements package will be forwarded to interested parties. Please contact smt@strathconas.ca.

Click here to link to the full Lord Strathcona’s Horse website

Categories
General Post

July Q Horse Heroes Honourees

LISA GRAHAM

Lisa has been involved with Quarter Horses for over 40 years, originally from Ontario, she moved to Saskatchewan to peruse her career as a member of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Lisa served her entire RCMP career in Saskatchewan, and is now retired; however, that does not mean that she isn’t still serving her community.  

Her equine involvement in the province is vast, currently she is serving as president for both the Saskatchewan Horse Federation and the Saskatchewan Quarter Horse Association. She, herself had big plans for the 2020 show and breeding season, having a halter mare very near her AQHA superior she had planned to complete that this year and have her bred; but of course, like so many in the horse industry this year, those plans have been pushed back. In spite of this personal setback however, Lisa has been an encouraging force in her equine community, promoting all breed virtual horse shows, organizing and promoting smaller scaled clinics, and helping the Saskatchewan Quarter Horse Association launch a new Horseback Riding Program. 

In addition to the many hours she volunteers to the horse community, she is also a dedicated member of her Royal Canadian Legion branch. Lisa has been instrumental in her community’s contribution to the Canadian Fallen Heroes Foundation project. The foundation partners with private and public organizations to put a face to the fallen, to share a glimpse into the lives of our soldiers and preserve their memory through memorial. Lisa has done much of the research into the families of the 30 plus names listed on the Craik War Memorial, gathering photos of the fallen and collecting their stories, it is a project that is dear to her and to so many Canadians.  

Aylesbury, Saskatchewan is where Lisa calls home. It’s a small community with a substantial elderly populationand the Legion plays a big part in the community. In a normal year it would host an assortment of community activities to help ensure the health and wellbeing of the region, but with Covid 19, its purpose has changed. In her role with the Legion now, Lisa finds she spends a lot of time reaching out into the community to find out who needs assistance, and who would really appreciate a good home cooked meal delivered.  

For her continued commitment to the Saskatchewan equine communitythe wellbeing of her communityand the preservation of the memory of our fallen war heroes, CQHA honours Lisa Graham as a 2020 Canadian Quarter Horse Association Q Horse Hero!  

DANIKA MORTON

CQHA is pleased to honour Danika Morton of Dryden, Ontario as a Q Horse Hero.  

The president of the Northern Lights Quarter Horse Association (NLQHA) works full time in Canada’s forestry industry; and owns two registered American Quarter Horses.  

A dedicated horse show enthusiast, she began riding as a child, and started showing on the AQHA circuit internationally when she was in her late teens. Danika has competed in all around events and in the last few years has focused on Ranch Riding events. In 2019 she qualified for the AQHA World Show in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, and competed in Ranch Riding.  

In March of this year when Covod-19 hit Canada, in anticipation of a very different show seasonDanika on behalf of the NLQHA began organizing. As a result of her hard work and dedication the NLQHA was the very first Canadian Quarter Horse organization to launch virtual horse shows; that inaugural show kicked off April 24, 2020. 

On May 21, 2020 the CQHA media team created a video montage of the special lead line class that Danika created for the NLQHA virtual show, featuring the images that each entry submitted. The video was widely shared on social media, and reshared by AQHA, and several other highprofile equine media accounts. In the spirit of offering fun virtual classes to everyone the association announced a costume class which kicksed off July 15, and CQHA plans to share those entries as well.  

With over 500 members of the NLQHA’s virtual show’s online FaceBook group, the shows which are open to all breeds are continuing to go strong. Danika says they get entries from all over Canada, and that it has been a great way for people to connect who otherwise may have never showed at the same show in their normal travels. CQHA asked Danika if she had any pearls of wisdom to share, from her experience of running these virtual shows, she said, “Keep practicing and working at home, because eventually we all will get back to the regular show pen.”  

For living up to the old adage that “the show must go on” and supporting her horse show community with fun alternative showing experiences we honour Danika Morton as a 2020 Canadian Quarter Horse Association Q Horse Hero!  

LEANNE KAROLES

Capt. Karoles is a dedicated supporter of the American Quarter Horse industry in Canada. A long-time amateur competitor, show sponsor, and breeder; her love for the breed started at an early age growing up in Alberta.  

Leanne’s career with the Canadian Armed Forces moved her to Ontario in the early 2000’s and while her horse showing has been temporarily put on hiatus multiple times due to being deployed over-seas in service to our country, it’s a passion that she is always happy to return home to.  

There are many different kinds of roles within the Canadian Military, to say one is Army, or Air Force, doesn’t do much to narrow that down; and because of security and protocols CQHA is limited as to what we can say about her role within Canada’s Army, however it is safe to say that many of the lessons she has learned during her long hours in the barn and in the saddle, have made her a better soldier. The compassion, patience, and communication skills that have been refined by years as an avid equestrian, have transferred easily to her job protecting our country and supporting her comrades and their families.  

Capt. Karoles has been deployed to the far east since before the outbreak of the global pandemic; an unexpected stress that has only added to the burden of Canadian military families, and their loved ones deployed. The situation has made her role within the Armed Forces all that more important to both service men and women and those waiting for them at home, to those she serves and supports we know she provides an important lifeline, a heroic feat onto its-self.  

For serving her country and providing unimaginable support to Canadian service men and women during this global pandemic CQHA honourCapt. Leanne Karoles as a 2020 Canadian Quarter Horse Association Q Horse Hero!  

Please watch the CQHA FaceBook page for an upcoming announcement as to when Leanne will be a guest in an exclusive CQHA interview.  

DAVID NICHOL

On the evening of May 9, 2020 David Nichol and his wife Rachel were driving down County Road 16, in Orangeville, Ontario when he spotted flames, and immediately turned up the driveway into the Hockley Hills School of Horsemanship; the home of Aitchison Show Horses. The riding school and training facility is owned by Julie Huppé and Dave Aitchison; Julie and Dave were just sitting down for dinner with their family when a knock came to their door, Nichol’s informed them that their tractor was on fire and flames were spreading to the barn.  

Quickly everyone including Mr. Nichol jumped into action to rescue the 19 horses and Kippins 

the barn cat who were all inside the barn. Julie said that while she, Dave and the kids rushed to move the horses to safety, this man whom they had never met before bravely held the flames and black smoke at bay with the water hose. 

The fire was battled for hours by the four responding fire departments, and in all the chaos that ensued Nichol and his wife left before Dave and Julie could even get his name or thank him 

When news reporters came the next day, Dave recapped the night’s events stating that they never would have been able to save all the horses had this stranger not come to their aid, Julie said “We are forever grateful and would like to thank him personally” hoping that the news media would reach the brave individual that helped them, and encourage him to return to the farm or give them a call.  

A week later Dave and Rachel returned to introduce themselves.  

For coming to the aid of the Hockley Hills School of Horsemanship; the home of Aitchison Show Horses, and redefining the term “Good Samaritan” we honour David Nichol  as a 2020 Canadian Quarter Horse Association Q Horse Hero!