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Canadian Mare Highest Seller at the 2023 Heritage Place Sale in Oklahoma

Congratulations to Alberta Quarter Horse Racing Association members Barry and Janice Sather from Beaverlodge, Alberta on selling their mare SINGLES CRUISE SI 101 at Heritage Place Sale in Oklahoma on Jan 19.

The 2016 brown mare was the top selling broodmare at the opening day of the Heritage Place Sale in Oklahoma on Jan 19th and the fourth high seller overall.

Singles Cruise is in foal to champion KVN Corona and fetched $95,000 USD. The California bred mare by Favorite Cartel and out of the Mr. Eye Opener mare Going Single was raced in Alberta and California by the Sathers. Singles Cruise won 9 out of 20 starts, earned $103,586 USD and is a Graded Stakes winner.

In 2018 she was the Alberta Quarter Horse Racing Association’s Grand Champion Running Horse and Champion Two Year Old.

Janice and Barry have embryo transfer babies from this great mare coming to the track in 2023 and beyond.

 

 

Written with material supplied by the Alberta Quarter Horse Racing Association

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2022 CNATT Fashion Show

The 2022 CNATT Fashion Show took place between Christmas and New Years. The videos submitted by all 12 Designers were posted on YouTube and the CQHA community was invited to vote on their favourites to determine the winners.
 
A total of 150 votes were cast, and in a last minute surprise the event’s sponsor Show Horse Today announced that they were so impressed by the creativity and fun, that all entries would receive a full page ad in a 2023 issue of their publication!!!
 
Congratulations to all participants and a special shout out to Leslie Riley of team My Sleepy Valentine on winning the fashion designer contest!
 
Leslie Riley of Ontario, representing team My Sleepy Valentine was crowned the 2022 CNATT "Barn Fashion" Designer of the Year
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Noseband November

Noseband November – how tight is too tight?

By Lindsay Grice

Lindsay is an renowned Ontario riding coach, horse show judge. You may know her as a columnist or speaker, specializing in equine behavior and equitation science.

Standard equipment in English disciplines. Training equipment in western. While nosebands are designed to prevent bit evasion, in the horse business, we’re inclined to think, “If a little is good, more is better!
 
Equestrian Canada initiated “Noseband November” , following a noseband measuring project at horse shows last year. (See below for horse show rules and current research findings re nosebands).
 
The question upstream from noseband “restrictions” is -Are we masking bit evasion without asking WHY the horse might be resisting?
 
The International Society of Equitation Science responded to the dilemma of cranking nosebands in equine sport with studies and by designing a noseband gauge for horse show ring stewards:
 
“Some equestrian manuals and competition rule books propose that ‘two fingers’ be used as a spacer to guard against over-tightening, but fail to specify where they should be applied or, indeed, the size of the fingers.”
“When this device was used to check noseband tightness on 737 horses at a variety of national and international dressage and eventing competitions, 44% of nosebands were found to be too close to the horse’s face to accommodate the tip of the taper gauge under the noseband. By extrapolation, this revealed that we are routinely preventing swallowing, chewing, yawning and licking in the name of sport.” I.S.E.S.
 
The EC rule, amended last year reads:
Cruelty can be defined as causing pain or unnecessary discomfort to a horse. As examples, an act of cruelty can be but is not limited to any of the following:
a) nosebands used in such a way that they interfere with the horse’s breathing, or be tight enough to cause pain or discomfort
Although we cannot interview horses to ask them how it feels to have an over-tightened noseband, the research is convincing that it’s a significant welfare issue.
 
Here’s a summary:
Horses wearing tight nosebands, have demonstrated elevated physiological stress responses (Fenner et al., 2016; McGreevy, 2012), are prevented from performing normal oral behaviours such as chewing, licking, and tongue resalivation (Fenner et al., 2016; McGreevy, 2012), experience stress due to constant unrelenting pressure, may experience physiological damage to nasal bones (Crago et al., 2019), and commonly experience pressure that greatly exceeds that of a tourniquet, which in humans restricts arterial blood flow and causes significant pain and potential nerve damage (Casey et al., 2013).
 
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Canadian Horse Journal Winter 2022 Issue

Featuring the CQHA sponsored Quarter Horse Division.

SPECIAL FEATURES

  • The Queen’s Legacy: A Passion for Horses
  • The Peter Gray Dressage Symposium
  • Lunging Horses – Why Bother?
  • Do Riders Crave Control?
  • Pony Club: Incubating Canada’s High-Performance Riders
  • Canada’s Wild Horses: An Uncertain Future
  • Crossing Mongolia for Charity

 

HEALTH

  • Can Horses Use Tools?
  • Three Common Equine Skin Cancers

 

BOOK REVIEWS

  • The Geography of Belonging
  • Riders of a Certain Age
  • Essential Horse Speak

 

DEPARTMENTS

  • Alberta’s Equine Economic Impact Study
  • Horse Council BC News
  • Canadian Therapeutic Riding Association News
  • Canadian Quarter Horse Association News

 

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Equine Disease Surveillance in Canada

Equine disease surveillance in Canada

In Canada, equine industry organizations such as the Canadian Quarter Horse Association work closely with other partners including the Canadian Animal Health Surveillance System, regional animal health networks (Western, Ontario, Quebec, Atlantic), governments, universities, veterinarians, laboratories and others to monitor diseases and share information.  

At the moment, these networks are paying attention to:

  • Equine infectious anemia (EIA), particularly in western Canada
  • Respiratory diseases (Influenza, Equine herpesvirus)
  • Antimicrobial use and resistance in horses
  • Vector borne diseases and climate change

Up to date information for horse owners includes:

  • The interactive Equine Diseases Dashboard
  • Infographics on EIA in Canada, including what you can do to protect your horses
  • Infographics on good practices for managing snotty noses and minor wounds

These are free and can all be found at: https://www.cahss.ca/cahss-networks/equine

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Area 3’s Youth Amazing Challenge

The Area 3 Quarter Horse Promotional Club hosted a new event this year at their Summer Classic Circuit hosted in Lindsey, ON for August 17th to 21st.

The goal of the 2022 Youth Amazing Challenge was to bring together all their youth in a setting outside of the show ring in order to build camaraderie and include those youth that were attending the show but not yet showing horses themselves.

Over 20 youth took part in this special event sponsored by CQHA and it provided an opportunity to introduce youth who may not have known each other or know each other well to work together as teams and build problem solving and planning skills through fun and interactive tasks.

It was an encouraging environment, where teams cheered each other on, had lots of laughter and completely entertained the spectators who were on the side line  boosting moral.

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Health and Regulations for the Transport of Animals in Canada Update

Transportation Code

An update to the 2001 transportation Code has been underway since December 2018. This multi-species Code of
Practice, covering animals from 14 national on-farm Codes, has been a massive undertaking. Additionally:

  • It has had to take into consideration robust federal regulations governing the transportation of animals in
    Canada (Health of Animals Regulations (HAR) Part XII: Transport of Animals), the long-awaited update of which
    was published in February 2019 along with an “evergreen” Interpretive Guidance for Regulated Parties.
  • The COVID 19 pandemic hit in 2020 halting all in-person meetings and requiring the nine Working Groups and
    the Code Development Committee to meet exclusively online. This was a huge learning curve for many and
    impeded the relationship-building opportunities and open dialogue that in-person meetings offer.
  • It is the first Code using NFACC’s Code development process that is not intended for on-farm use, and included
    the care of animals during transportation as well as when offloaded at specific types of intermediary sites.
  • It was initiated by NFACC versus a national stakeholder group representing transporters and other primary
    stakeholders, which has led to additional challenges in following the Code development process.

At the outset it was recognized that this complex Code required all the time afforded under the Canadian Agricultural
Partnership’s (CAP) AgriAssurance Program time allowance. Unfortunately, over the last several months it has become
apparent that a finalized transportation Code is not achievable by the CAP program end date of March 31, 2023. Initially,
attention was focused on finding alternative means for completing this Code. However, in recent months further
challenges surrounding the lack of national lead organizations have led to concerns with proceeding to update the
transportation Code. It has become prudent to take stock of the issues being raised and consider alternative approaches
for addressing humane transportation of livestock and poultry.

After deliberations with varied perspectives being brought forward, the NFACC board agreed, and secured support from
our project funders, to pursue a Risk Assessment (RA) coupled with a Collaboration Planning Exercise (CPE). It was
further agreed that RA & CPE are the soundest approach to:

  • Make best use of the time remaining under the current project to identify a path forward,
  • Ensure that we make best use of the time and funding already invested,
  • Ensure that we make best use of content developed to date through the project,
  • Unite the diverse interests around humane transportation into an achievable and cohesive plan,
  • Ensure that any decisions are consistent with NFACC’s mission and processes (and risk tolerances),
  • Ensure that we identify a viable path forward for the future.

Additionally, transporters and intermediary site operators are key stakeholders who need to be more formally
involved/engaged in a way that facilitates sector-wide inclusively. Hence, the remainder of the project will focus on
conducting a RA and CPE with the goal of determining viable options that can be operationalized with the broad support
of stakeholders.


Thank you to the many people who have participated in working groups and committees. There is a wealth of
information in the work already produced under this project activity and a strong desire has been expressed to make
best use of the content that has been developed to date. Both the RA and CPE are expected to provide possible
approaches for further consideration (e.g., incorporating transportation within commodity-specific Codes of Practice).

It should also be noted that while updating the transportation Code by March 2023 is not possible, much has already
been accomplished through this project. Aside from progress on various drafts of the transportation Code:

  • The transportation sections of 11 on-farm Codes were aligned with the new Health of Animals Regulations, an
    effort that required a significant investment of resources from 2019 until early 2022. The transportation Code
    team undertook this massive effort and worked with national livestock and poultry groups and CFIA.
  • A substantial update to the Environmental Scan of Regulatory and Operational Considerations report was
    undertaken in 2019, which included incorporating significant updates from both the Health of Animals
    Regulations and the Safe Food for Canadians Regulations.
  • A survey at the outset of the project captured top-of-mind concerns related to humane transportation with a
    report produced.

Previous progress reports are available here.

For information on the steps of the Code development process and progress of the Codes being updated follow this link.


Funded in part by the Government of Canada under the Canadian Agricultural Partnership’s AgriAssurance Program, a federal, provincial, territorial initiative.

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Aug/Sept Issue of Canadian Cowboy Country

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Canadian Horse Journal Early Summer 2022

SPECIAL FEATURES
  • Reducing the Risk of Eventing Falls
  • How Do OTTBs Compare to Other Breeds?
  • Stallion Housing Affects Their Welfare
  • How to Create a Paddock Paradise
  • Commercial Horse Transport: The good, the bad, and the ugly
  • Riding the Rail: Winning tips for flat classes
  • Are You Riding All Your Gears?
  • Practice Emotional Resilience for a Better Ride
  • Riding Canada’s Beaches
HEALTH
  • App to Monitor Equine Body Condition
  • Vaccination Guidelines for Healthier Horses
  • Should You Breed Your Mare?
  • Close Call – Saving the Life of a Newborn Colt
DEPARTMENTS
  • Horse Council BC News
  • Manitoba Horse Council News
  • Canadian Quarter Horse Association News
  • Canadian Therapeutic Riding Association News